Feed Me

 

 

 The Island's Only Homeless Cat Manager:

Dedicated to preventing future generations of homeless cats

 

What is a Feral CAT?

 

Feral cats are the "wild" offspring of domestic cats and are primarily the result of pet owners' abandonment or failure to spay and neuter their animals, allowing them to breed uncontrolled.  Feral cat 'colonies' can be found behind shopping areas or businesses, in alleys, parks, abandoned buildings, and rural areas. They are elusive and do not trust humans.

Many people assume their animals will survive when they move away and leave them behind. Contrary to popular belief, domestic animals do not automatically return to their "natural" instincts and they cannot fend for themselves!

 

Spay and Neuter

 

Studies have proven that trap-neuter-release (T-N-R) is the single most successful method of stabilizing and maintaining healthy feral cat colonies with the least possible cost to local governments and residents, while providing the best life for the animals themselves.

Spaying/neutering homeless cats:

  • Stabilizes the population at manageable levels.
  • Eliminates annoying behaviors associated with mating.
  • Is humane to the animals and fosters compassion in the neighborhoods.
  • Is more effective and less costly than repeated attempts at extermination: costs for repeatedly trapping and killing feral colonies are far higher than promoting stable, non-breeding colonies in the same location. Vacated areas are soon filled by other cats, who start the breeding process over again.

Removing cats does not solve the feral cat problem, and local shelters do not have the resources to trap the animals.   As long as there are humans, there will be free roaming cats.  So together we must "fix" the problem through T-N-R methods.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

I saw a stray cat in my neighborhood. What should I do?

Dial 512-4884 and tell the PB Island Cats Field Director of the sighting giving as complete a description as possible. Someone will respond to your call promptly.

What is a feral cat?

Feral cats are the offspring of domesticated cats that were abandoned without sterilization. They are not wildlife – they are not pets. Having never known the touch of human hands, the cats are neither social nor pets. They are free roaming cats that by nature cannot fend for themselves and if left unmanaged, they can become a public nuisance and will breed prolifically. Without human intervention, their lives are shortened by malnutrition, disease and trauma. Kitten mortality is high in the feral cat world, and left unchecked, the population growth will lead to an even higher rate of euthanasia at animal shelters. Further complicating matters is the fact that some of the cats on the streets are someone’s pet and others that are homeless - but not feral - and were abandoned by callous owners.

Are there many feral cats in Palm Beach?

When PB Island Cats was selected to be the Town’s feral cat management program, a thorough census was conducted at every known colony using a stealth camcorder camera to photograph the cats. Because of the elusive nature of feral cats and because there may be colonies being cared for by residents that we do not know about, the following is an educated estimate. The known feral cat population is about 550 cats in Palm Beach.

How do I know if the cat is feral?

By nature, cats are hesitant about encounter

ring humans, but the feral cat will run and hide while the pet will linger to determine if you are friend or foe. The Town has approved management of the feral cats in Palm Beach and much work has been accomplished, so look at the cat’s left ear to see if the ear has been tipped/cropped (the tip of the ear is removed). The nationally recognized industry standard of feral cat management is clipping the left ear for recognition of a cat in the management program and one that has been neutered. [READ MORE]

Is “management” humane, safe and effective?

The answer is very much so, and management is the only way to control the population growth. Experienced and trained volunteers, under the direction of a professional Field Director, are implementing the only nationally recommended program of T-N-R (trap, neuter, return) and the only successful method to humanely reduce the homeless cat population and realize the goal of the program. Cats are trapped using a humane trap that employs a variable trigger setting mechanism, has no springs, has a 98% catch rate and complies with State and Federal humane laws. PB Island Cats has entered into agreement only with veterinarians experienced with feral cats who perform the neutering surgery and ear cropping. The cats are immunized against diseases and vaccinated against rabies, and medical treatment is provided if needed for illness or injury. The cat is returned to its “home” in good health and is monitored for life.

Does T-N-R work?

It is the only population control method that has been proven to be successful nationwide. Communities frustrated with over abundance of feral cats have tried extermination, but it is very expensive, inhumane and has failed multiple times. Long term studies have shown that by removing the cats there is a “vacuum effect” created. The void is filled by rodents or other animal life to replace the vacated animals, or another cat moves in and the reproduction cycle begins again. The World Health Organization documented the adverse effect of eradicating of cats on Macquarie Island (located in the Pacific Ocean between New Zealand and Antarctica) citing the removal of the cats allowed a rapid growth in the number of rats and rabbits which together caused widespread environmental damage. Cats were imported back to the Island to re-establish the ecological balance.  For example: Just a few short years ago well over 100 baby kittens were born to feral mothers on the island...  In 2012 only 24 kittens were born!

Does PB Island Cats endorse euthanasia for cats?

PB Island Cats is a “no-kill” organization! No one associated with PB Island Cats believes killing innocent animals is humane or acceptable for healthy animals. Euthanasia is practiced only when the extent of injury or disease causes continued suffering and poor quality of life. Medical treatment is determined on a case by case basis between the veterinarian and the Field Director. PB Island Cats strongly believes every life is precious and that animals are not an expendable commodity.

Is there an answer to the feral cat population problem?

Most definitely, and it begins with responsible cat ownership. PB Island Cats strongly recommends pet owners have their pets spayed or neutered, micro-chipped for identification and keep them safely at home. PB Island Cats has embarked on an outreach program to the community of educational information. Brochures are available at various retailers in Palm Beach and are free to the public; advertisements appear in the newspaper periodically; direct mailings are done throughout the year and this website has a lot of information about how to help. The answer to the feral cat problem is responsible, compassionate care and maintenance by our residents and this organization, PB Island Cats.

So what does PB Island Cats do about feral kittens?

Volunteers and colony caretakers make every effort to pick up kittens at the optimal age of 6-8 weeks when they can be socialized to become loving pets. Kind hearts and willing homes are in place for foster care pending adoptions. When adopted at a young age, per-arrangements are made with the veterinarian to spay and neuter the cat when age appropriate. We are always looking for forever homes, and anyone interested is urged to call 512-4884 to volunteer.

 

How You Can Make A Difference.

 

PB Island Cats is a public charity. We receive no government funding and depend on donations from the public for our continued operation.

Palm Beach Island Cats provides food, sterilization, vaccines and other medical care. We greatly appreciate your support and thank you for any help you can give.

As a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, donations to PB Island Cats are tax deductible.

Donations may be mailed to:

Palm Beach Island Cats, Inc.

P.O. Box 173

Palm Beach, FL 33480

561-512-4884

Or

[Click Here]

 

PALM BEACH ISLAND CATS MISSION STATEMENT

 

PBIC prevents future generations of homeless cats by implementing the humane practice of Trap, Neuter and Return.

 

PBIC maintains the current population through daily feeding, watering and providing medical care as needed.

 

PBIC responds to all citizens’ concerns in order to achieve peaceful coexistence between our Town’s cats and residents.

 

 

 Dedicated to preventing future generations of homeless cats

 

What is a Feral CAT?

 

Feral cats are the "wild" offspring of domestic cats and are primarily the result of pet owners' abandonment or failure to spay and neuter their animals, allowing them to breed uncontrolled.  Feral cat 'colonies' can be found behind shopping areas or businesses, in alleys, parks, abandoned buildings, and rural areas. They are elusive and do not trust humans.

Many people assume their animals will survive when they move away and leave them behind. Contrary to popular belief, domestic animals do not automatically return to their "natural" instincts and they cannot fend for themselves!

 

Spay and Neuter

 

Studies have proven that trap-neuter-release is the single most successful method of stabilizing and maintaining healthy feral cat colonies with the least possible cost to local governments and residents, while providing the best life for the animals themselves.

Spaying/neutering homeless cats:

  • Stabilizes the population at manageable levels.
  • Eliminates annoying behaviors associated with mating.
  • Is humane to the animals and fosters compassion in the neighborhoods.
  • Is more effective and less costly than repeated attempts at extermination: costs for repeatedly trapping and killing feral colonies are far higher than promoting stable, non-breeding colonies in the same location. Vacated areas are soon filled by other cats, who start the breeding process over again.

Removing cats does not solve the feral cat problem, and local shelters do not have the resources to trap them. As long as there are humans there will be free roaming cats, so together we must "fix" then problem through TNR methods.

 

Donations may be mailed to:

Palm Beach Island Cats, Inc.

P.O. Box 173

Palm Beach, FL 33480

561-512-4884

Or

[Click Here]

Executive Director

Leslie Moss

 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

 

The governing body of Palm Beach Island Cats, Inc. is comprised of local residents interested in the humane treatment of the stray, abandoned, feral and homeless cats living in Palm Beach.

David Leavitt
Gail Leavitt
Cheryl Love
Florence Metzger
George J. Palladino
Kim Puffenbarger
Dr. John Strasswimmer

 

ADVISORY BOARD

Richard Anderson - CEO of Peggy Adams ARL

Daniel Filion - Cat Behaviorist

Marcy Lahart, Esq. - Specialist in Animal Law

Brad Ochstein, DVM - Island Animal Hospital

 

HONORARY BOARD

Bill Diamond
Regine Diamond
Isabel Furlaud
Eva Jacobi
Herb Jacobi
Susan Lloyd
Allen Mason
Zelda Mason
Jane Woodman

 

Palm Beach Island Cats is committed to providing only the best medical care for the homeless cats in Palm Beach and has partnered with some the finest veterinarians and clinics in the area.

 

 

Community Partners:

 


American Humane Association-

 

 

The mission of American Humane Association is to ensure the welfare, wellness and well-being of children and animals, and to unleash the full potential of the bond between humans and animals to the mutual benefit of both.  

 

 

 

 

 


Island Animal Hospital-

Island Animal Hospital is a full-service veterinary practice located in Palm Beach, Florida; providing medical, surgical and dental care for pets as well as veterinary acupuncture, nutritional counseling, and pet boarding. They emphasize responsible pet ownership including wellness and preventative care.  Their well trained and experienced veterinarians believe in taking the time to provide compassionate care for pets at every stage of their life.

561-833-8552

Dr. Mary Ellen Scully & Dr. Brad Ochstein

 


Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League-

Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League is a limited-admission humane society and provides services to over 20,000 cats, dogs, puppies and kittens each year. Operating continuously since 1925, it is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and does not receive funding from city, county, state, or the federal government, or local organizations with similar names. Their vision is to create a community where 100% of the adoptable animals find loving homes and no animals will be euthanized because of pet overpopulation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corporate Sponsors:

 

 


Bessemer Trust-

A privately owned company whose sole mission is to help their clients manage their wealth so that it has a positive effect on their lives and the lives of generations to come.

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